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Creating accurate sensors for agriculture

February 13, 2019

We have built all parts of the 30MHz platform ourselves. From the underlying cloud structure, the data platform with all analysis and consultation options, up to the sensor system that provides for that very data. The latter exists, as you may know, from a gateway, repeaters and the sensors you have chosen from our sensor portfolio.

A bit of nuance: We make existing sensors wireless and do not develop the sensor component itself. There are an awful lot of parties in the world that specialize in this. This does not mean, however, that you simply buy a sensor (online) and just connect it to a piece of hardware that makes it wireless. This is where our embedded software engineers show their skill. They make the sensor power and communication technology wireless and (much more importantly) configure it in a very accurate way.

Obviously, every company can claim that, but we know the latter because we do not make the sensors immediately available for sale after the development period, but have them checked thoroughly by agricultural research institutions. For example, the Pointed Microclimate sensor has been tested by the Proeftuin Zwaagdijk.

The advantages of the Barani Shield

In the tests carried out, the measurement results of five Pointed Microclimate (PMC) sensors were compared with those of the sensors used by Proeftuin Zwaagdijk. The comparison focused on the room temperature and the relative humidity. The PMCs are equipped with a Barani MeteoShield that does not use a forced air flow. The Barani is characterized by its spiral design, which eliminates almost all effects of solar heat in low wind conditions and is more accurate than most ventilated shields on sunny winter days. In addition, strong spiral air flow to the sensor prevents the formation of a hot air bubble on hot summer days.

Another advantage of the Barani MeteoShield is that no electricity connection is required. Sending the measurement data requires little energy and therefore works on the basis of a battery. You can easily move the sensors and carry out measurements at different positions in a greenhouse.

Conclusions of the study

During the study, the largest possible difference in conditions with regard to the greenhouse temperature and the humidity was created. An average measurement over an interval of 15 minutes was used when collecting the data. One of the most important conclusions from Proeftuin researcher Ing. M.P. Blind was that, due to the small differences between them, the sensors are very suitable for mapping the distribution of the temperature and the air humidity in greenhouses.

Another researcher adds: “I have seen many companies come and go trying to create accurate industry grade sensors which are suitable for everyday use in greenhouses. The 30MHz solution is unique and unlike anything I have seen before. Due to its design and the overall technical specifications, the sensors are unmatched in accuracy and provide the missing link between traditional monitoring and future greenhouse technology.”

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